The Seventh Art Stand is a rapid response initiative
which utilizes film to bridge communities and
create new inroads for civil rights discussion.

We are currently seeking venues and community partners to host screenings, discussions, and voter registration drives in September or early October 2018, in advance of the upcoming 2018 Midterm elections, which will be held on November 6th.

The Seventh Art Stand has been covered by many national outlets, including The New York Times.

ABOUT THE SEVENTH ART STAND

The first edition of the Seventh Art Stand took place in May 2017, after the initial Travel Ban, and was organized by Courtney Sheehan of Northwest Film Forum, Richard Abramowitz of Abramorama, and filmmaker Vivian Hua. Centered around Anti-Islamophobia, over 50 participating venues in half the States held discussions and showed films from the countries affected by the ban The. second installment was dedicated to Uplifting Black Voices, after the Philando Castile ruling.

CURRENT INITIATIVE:
III. MIGRANT SOLIDARITY
(SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER 2018)

Migrant Solidarity was chosen for its applicability across numerous cultures, in a time of xenophobia. The Supreme Court’s upholding of the Muslim Ban, brutal separation of families crossing the border, and deportation of legal permanent residents are just some of the reasons for revitalizing the Stand. Some of the themes the series might explore include:

– Border-crossing between Mexico and the United States (el mar del mar)
– Asylum seekers due to violence
– Syrian refugees resettling in the U.S. (This is Home, Dayla’s Other Country)
– Muslim-Americans running for office (Time for Ilhan)
– South Asian discrimination
– Japanese internment and detaining of legal residents (And Then They Came for Us)
Film suggestions shown here.

WHAT IS THE MODEL?

Screenings for The Seventh Art Stand combine a film screening with a discussion (panels, guest speakers, and Q&A’s with filmmakers have all been done), in order to offer extra context and a potential for community engagement. Venues are encouraged to program films that speak to their diverse audiences and communities. Sample programming might look something like:

Northwest Film Forum previously held a screening of el mar la mar, which is an experimental film that weaves together stories from the US/Mexico border, had a post-screening discussion with immigrant rights organizer Maru Mora Villalpando, and Luis Torres, an immigrant who crossed the U.S. border as a teen. Paired with bilingual English-Spanish voter registration.

Arab American National Museum near Detroit, Michigan is programming Time for Ilhan which is about the first Muslim, Somali-American lawmaker, and are pairing it with a discussion with a panel discussion about challenges of running for office and what the Muslim Ban is now. Paired with voter registration.

WHAT FILMS DO I CHOOSE?

While venues are absolutely free to program however they like, we have attempted to ease the process by putting together a list of recommended films: http://bit.ly/seventhart2018

We are especially suggesting Time for Ilhan, due to its timeliness and connection with voting and elections.

All venues screen and program films in the same way they would for an average screening. If you need additional assistance, please reach out.

WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
HOSTING A VOTER REGISTRATION DRIVE?

Every community has voter registration groups who are keen to register new voters at events! Read this simple step-by-step guide to hosting voter registration drives.

Options for voter registration might include:

Finding volunteers within your organization who would be willing to register voters, through sites like Vote.org (Online), When We All Vote (Online), TurboVote (Online), HeadCount.org (Online).

Enlisting the help of local groups to register voters, such as voting rights groups like League of Women Voters (National, w/ local chapters), Spread the Vote (South), or Voto Latino (Latino voters).

Connecting with local chapters of Indivisible for guidance of voting registration or soliciting volunteers.

Please reach out to Vivian Hua seventhartstand@gmail.com if you need additional partner suggestions for your area, or if you have any questions about the Seventh Art Stand. After you confirm participation, we will be in touch with more info and updates.

NOTE: You are free to host voter registration drives even if you are a nonprofit, as voting rights organizations are generally nonpartisan. Voting is everyone’s right! Nonetheless, please note that every state has different voter registration policies. You can learn about yours at Rock the Vote.

DUE DATE FOR PARTICIPATION IS AUGUST 31ST, 2018!

SEND ALL SCREENING DETAILS TO VIVIAN HUA at seventhartstand@gmail.com.

PAST INITIATIVES

II. UPLIFTING BLACK VOICES

Initially inspired by the Philando Castile ruling in Minnesota, but continuously relevant, the focus centers around films that empower African-Americans, celebrate successful leaders, and offer historical context that leads to the continued unjust treatment of communities of color.

I. ANTI-ISLAMOPHOBIA

As a response to the travel ban, this initiative kicked off The Seventh Art Stand in February 2017, with the goal of highlighting Muslim American filmmakers and building understanding between communities about the unique plight of Muslims in the United States, as well as abroad.

NATIONAL SCREENINGS

NOVEMBER 1, 2017 WHOSE STREETS? @ SHEPHERD HALL ROOM OF THE CITY COLLEGE OF NY (HARLEM, NY)

Hosted by The Documentary Forum @City College of New York, Third World Newsreel, The Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership and the Center for Workers Education

Co-Director Sabaah Folayan in Attendance for Q&A

Told by the activists and leaders who live and breathe this movement for justice, Whose Streets?, by Filmmakers Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis, is an unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising. When unarmed teenager Michael Brown is killed by police and left lying in the street for hours, it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis, Missouri. Grief, long-standing racial tensions and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigil and protest this latest tragedy. Empowered parents, artists, and teachers from around the country come together as freedom fighters. As the national guard descends on Ferguson with military grade weaponry, these young community members become the torchbearers of a new resistance.

RSVP HERE.

OCTOBER 27, 2017 – TWO TRAINS RUNNIN’ @ METCALF AUDITORIUM @ RISD MUSEUM (PROVIDENCE, RI)

Presented with Dorcas International, with filmmaker Sam Pollard to introduce the film and do a Q&A.

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

7:00pm screening, with reception at 6:15pm!

OCTOBER 19, 2017 – REFUGEE KIDS @ HENRY FORD CENTENNIAL LIBRARY (DEARBORN, MI)

Presented with the Wayne State Equity Action Lab and the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights

FREE with RSVP HERE

The Arab American National Museum in partnership with the Henry Ford Centennial Library is pleased to screen the short documentary, Refugee Kids: One Small School Takes On the World. The film follows students at a New York City summer program for youth seeking asylum from the world’s most volatile conflicts. The film presents the experiences and stories from the children themselves as they share stories of escaping war and conflict and the life-changing decision to resettle in America.

Immediately following the screening will be a Q&A with director Renée Silverman via Skype.

9TH ANNUAL BLACK PANTHER PARTY FILM FESTIVAL
SEPTEMBER 29 & 30, 2017 + OCTOBER 6 & 7, 2017
@ MAYSLES DOCUMENTARY CENTER (HARLEM, NY)

Produced by the Black Panther Commemoration Committee, NY and Maysles Cinema

THEME: No. 8 of the 10-point party platform
We Want Freedom For All Black Men Held In Federal, State, County And City Prisons And Jails. We believe that all Black people should be released from the many jails and prisons because they have not received a fair and impartial trial.

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 @ DORIS DUKE THEATRE (HONOLULU, HI)

Syrian rebels who call themselves Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently risk their lives to document the atrocities committed by ISIS in their homeland. CITY OF GHOSTS, which had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, takes a hard-hitting, ground-level look at atrocities in a part of the world that may seem foreign to many viewers, but whose impact will be no less devastating.

Special guests: Two journalists from Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently will attend the opening Sept. 28 screening at 6pm. Join us for a post-screening talk with one of the founders of Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently Abdalaziz Alhamza and Walaa Altahaan. See Alhamza’s The New York Times‘ opinion piece here.

SEPTEMBER 23, 2017 @ MAYSLES DOCUMENTARY CENTER (HARLEM, NY)

Copwatch is the true story of We Copwatch, an organization whose mission is to film police activity as a non-violent form of protest and deterrent to police brutality. Around the country, a network of regular people take up cameras to bear witness to police actions and hold law enforcement to accountability. Director Camilla Hall profiles several We Copwatch members, including Kevin Moore, who filmed the arrest of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, and Ramsey Orta, the man who filmed Eric Garner’s fatal Staten Island arrest in the devastating video that has galvanized protestors and activists nationwide. And yet Orta is the only person involved in these incidents who has seen the inside of a jail cell. In her powerful directorial debut, Hall crafts an intriguing and incredibly timely profile of citizen-journalist-activists who are seeking to disrupt the ever-present challenge of police violence.

Q&As to be announced.